Temporary departure route from Rotterdam The Hague Airport

LVNL has taken a temporary measure for handling some of the outbound air traffic from Rotterdam The Hague Airport. Aircraft taking off from runway 06 and turning West will receive instructions from air traffic control to fly straight on up to 1,500 feet (about 500 meters) and then start the turn to the West to follow the regular SID route.

In the past, most of the traffic at the Rotterdam airport consisted of propeller-driven aircraft and small jet aircraft. However, it became increasingly clear that the relevant standard departure route, involving flying in an easterly direction from runway 06 and then turning West, was not appropriate for larger jet aircraft. These aircraft need a larger turning circle than the SID prescribes. For that reason, a different working method entered into effect on 5 December 2014 for this traffic taking off from runway 06, also known as the REFSO or TULIP departure. In practice, this route is used primarily by aircraft that depart on the Lansingerland side and are headed for London.

Making a wider turn, as was done in the working method before 5 December 2014, meant that aircraft taking off from Rotterdam could come closer to the traffic at Schiphol than is desirable from the point of view of aviation safety. Because the number of jet aircraft on this route was growing, the risk of interference with Schiphol traffic landing on the Kaag runway (06) and in parallel approaches from the south to the Zwanenburg runway (36c) and the Aalsmeer runway (36R) could increase. This was seen as an undesirable situation from the point of view of safety.

For the above reasons, LVNL announced a temporary measure, which is currently in effect for Rotterdam The Hague Airport. Aircraft taking off from runway 06 will now receive instructions from air traffic control to climb straight on to 1,500 feet (about 500 meters) and when passing this altitude, to start the left turn in order to then follow the regular SID route. As a result, the aircraft that follow this route will turn sooner (and consequently also at a lower altitude) above Lansingerland. All other departure routes remain unchanged.

The Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment, Rotterdam The Hague Airport and LVNL are currently working together closely on a structural solution to the problem, taking account of the interests of (flying) safety, the environment and the economy. The aim is to implement the ultimate solution from November 2015.